There is a lot of talk about people ditching Windows for some variation of Linux but not many seem to have written a review of the switch after a month. In this article, I hope to help out my fellow noobs who are also considering to move to Linux Mint.

So why did I even consider the Switch?

To begin with, I was fed up of Windows being Windows. It was constantly updated at the most inconvenient times and the size of the operating system compared to Linux distributions. Linux Mint is also free and according to Lifewire “Linux Has Many More Free Applications”.

Linux is also considered to be safer compared to Windows. The Ubuntu website actually states “Anti-virus software does exist for Linux, but you probably don’t need to use it. Viruses that affect Linux are still very rare. Some argue that this is because Linux is not as widely used as other operating systems, so no one writes viruses for it. Others argue that Linux is intrinsically more secure, and security problems that viruses could make use off are fixed very quickly”. Like Ubuntu, Linux Mint has a huge and extremely helpful community which are always willing to help out.

But the main reason that I decided to switch to Linux Mint is the clean and professional interface.

Did I have any problems learning to use the system?

The simple answer is no. I have used Ubuntu many times in the past so I was familiar with Linux to begin with. I actually found Linux Mint easier to navigate compared to Ubuntu.

The Linux Mint Software Manager makes it easy to download the common apps and if the app isn’t listed a quick google search helped me install it within a few clicks. In terms of noticeable differences, the only difference I found apart from the interface were the fonts that programs used.

What about the software I used on Windows?

Yes, there were a couple of sacrifices but I managed to get up and running with alternatives fast. Here are some of the alternatives I used…

Windows:Linux:
Microsoft OfficeWPS Office and Office Online
Photoshop Gimp
OutlookThunderbird

The truth of the matter is that there are tons of alternatives for just about any task you can do in Windows – That’s what I found anyway.

It’s important to remember that there is a huge number of software distributors who distribute Linux versions of their programs. A great example is the web browser Firefox and text editor Brackets. Steam is also available! If you require a specific program which is available on Windows, Wine enables you to install it. But that’s a story for another day!

Is Linux Mint a keeper?

Yes, I would definitely say so! I feel more comfortable using Linux Mint compared to any other Linux distro’s I used. I have been testing another Debian based distro called Sparky Linux which I also like and will certainly review soon. But for now, especially as a beginner I will be keeping to Linux Mint.

Do you have any recommendations for new users? Comment below!