Photo of the Huawei Watch GT

Huawei Watch GT – Review

In a time where everyone seems to be concerned about their fitness and the battery life of their devices, Huawei released the Watch GT. I was lucky enough to get my hands of this watch with my mobile phone contract.

So what is the Huawei watch GT and what does it have to offer?

The Huawei watch GT is a smartwatch running on Huawei’s own operating system. They claim that the watch can last for up to 2 weeks. This is great news, I used to own a Fitbit Blaze and a Samsung Gear Fit Pro and none of these devices lasted that long!

The watch itself seems to be more of a fitness watch with many useful features such as the Huawei TruSeen™ heart rate monitor which they claim “provides a more efficient and accurate real-time personal measurement of your heart-rate”. They also claim that it uses a “self-learning algorithm and innovative sensors”.

The watch has a ceramic bezel design, a stainless steel shell and DLC Coating. The screen itself is Amoled which looks amazing!

It also features precise location which they claim, supports “3 Satellite Positioning Systems” including GPS, GLONASS and Galileo.

According to Huawei, the watch “provides coaching in introductory to advanced running courses to assist you in real-time while also providing guidance training”. It supports a wide variety of sports such as swimming which they don’t advise if you have the leather rubber band. It offers professional cycling assessments and if you’re into climbing, it features a barometer, compass and altitude tool.

The watch also features Huawei TruSleep™ 2.0 which they claim was produced “in a joint-study with Harvard Medical School.  They claim “identifies common sleep-related issues and provides more than 200 potential suggestions to help you sleep better.

The watch is great for counting steps, your sedentary status and monitoring peak intense activities. It provides notifications for most messages, phone calls, alarms and set reminders.

Specs:

Dimensions: 46.5 mm x 46.5 mm x 10.6 mm
Weight:46g
Build: Stainless Steel frame, ceramic back
Display: 1.39in AMOLED display
ROM:128MB
RAM:16MB
Bluetooth: 4.2, LE
GPS: Yes, with GLONASS, GALILEO
Sensors: Accelerometer, gyro, heart rate, barometer, compass
Battery: Non-removable Li-Ion 420 mAh battery –
14-30 day battery life
Compatible with:Android 4.4 or later
iOS 9.0 or later

So what do I think after using it?

I think that this watch has the potential to be a great fitness watch. Sadly, you can’t add any other apps on it as you can with Wear OS and Apple Watch. However, it’s great as a fitness watch. I would definitely recommend it! To be honest, it was hard to find any other disadvantages because the watch is excellent. Below are what I found to be the advantages and disadvantages of this watch…

Advantages:

  • Cool looking design
  • AMOLED Display
  • Advanced Fitness Tracking
  • TruSleep™ 2.0 Sleep tracking
  • TruSeen™ heart rate monitor
  • Notifications
  • Amazing battery life
  • Great price

Disadvantages:

  • No app store or possibility to download more apps
  • You are restricted to the watch faces that are built-in
  • No Contactless payments

The verdict

I would definitely recommend this watch to a friend looking to buy a fitness watch. If on the other hand, you are looking for a general smartwatch, I would recommend an Apple Watch if your an iPhone user and a WearOS watch if you’re an Android user. I made this decision based on the fact that you can’t download apps or customise the watch, which are the features you might want from a general use SmartWatch. This watch is in fact just like a Fitbit. I do however hope that Huawei changes this and adds support for other apps and features.

Ditched Windows 10 for Linux Mint – 1 Month on

There is a lot of talk about people ditching Windows for some variation of Linux but not many seem to have written a review of the switch after a month. In this article, I hope to help out my fellow noobs who are also considering to move to Linux Mint.

So why did I even consider the Switch?

To begin with, I was fed up of Windows being Windows. It was constantly updated at the most inconvenient times and the size of the operating system compared to Linux distributions. Linux Mint is also free and according to Lifewire “Linux Has Many More Free Applications”.

Linux is also considered to be safer compared to Windows. The Ubuntu website actually states “Anti-virus software does exist for Linux, but you probably don’t need to use it. Viruses that affect Linux are still very rare. Some argue that this is because Linux is not as widely used as other operating systems, so no one writes viruses for it. Others argue that Linux is intrinsically more secure, and security problems that viruses could make use off are fixed very quickly”. Like Ubuntu, Linux Mint has a huge and extremely helpful community which are always willing to help out.

But the main reason that I decided to switch to Linux Mint is the clean and professional interface.

Did I have any problems learning to use the system?

The simple answer is no. I have used Ubuntu many times in the past so I was familiar with Linux to begin with. I actually found Linux Mint easier to navigate compared to Ubuntu.

The Linux Mint Software Manager makes it easy to download the common apps and if the app isn’t listed a quick google search helped me install it within a few clicks. In terms of noticeable differences, the only difference I found apart from the interface were the fonts that programs used.

What about the software I used on Windows?

Yes, there were a couple of sacrifices but I managed to get up and running with alternatives fast. Here are some of the alternatives I used…

Windows:Linux:
Microsoft OfficeWPS Office and Office Online
Photoshop Gimp
OutlookThunderbird

The truth of the matter is that there are tons of alternatives for just about any task you can do in Windows – That’s what I found anyway.

It’s important to remember that there is a huge number of software distributors who distribute Linux versions of their programs. A great example is the web browser Firefox and text editor Brackets. Steam is also available! If you require a specific program which is available on Windows, Wine enables you to install it. But that’s a story for another day!

Is Linux Mint a keeper?

Yes, I would definitely say so! I feel more comfortable using Linux Mint compared to any other Linux distro’s I used. I have been testing another Debian based distro called Sparky Linux which I also like and will certainly review soon. But for now, especially as a beginner I will be keeping to Linux Mint.

Do you have any recommendations for new users? Comment below!

Snab OverTone EP-101M – Great budget earphones!

Snab is a brand that I recently discovered when I was looking for new in-ear headphones. Being a fan of heavy bass, I was looking for something to suit my taste.

I first considered the Sony MDR-XB50AP which are part of the Extra Bass range, but they weren’t to my taste. But then a mate of mine said that he purchased the Snab OverTone EP-101M and that he was very happy with them, so I gave them a go. I was pleasantly surprised, not only was the sound clear but it was bassy just the way I like it.

Price: €35.50 (£30.78 , $40.24)

Build Quality

The overall build quality is of a high standard, especially when comparing it to other headphones on the market of similar price. The primary material of the housing is aluminium which looks very stylish. The earpice’s are magnetic which eliminates them from getting tangled.

The cable feels strong and is formed of a firmly twisted wire with an elastic, slippery surface. The cable itself comes with a pre-applied clip which I found helps the headphones stay in place.

The cable also comes with a single button which you can use to answer calls and pause your music which is very convenient.

Sound quality

The sound quality is exceptional. I used many in-ear headphones from all sorts of brands such as Beats, Sony, JVC and Blitzwolf and for my taste, the Overtone 101M seem to sound better – but we all have different taste and the headphone brands mentioned all have their own strengths and weaknesses.

If your a fan of good bass and good quality sound then these headphones are for you!

Specs

  • Driver: Neodymium HD Dynamic
  • Driver Diameter: 10 mm
  • Frequency range: 20 – 22 000 Hz
  • Rated Power:    1 mW
  • Max Power: 10 mW
  • 93 dB S.P.L @ 1 KHz
  • Microphone sensitivity: -35 +/- 4dB
  • Impedance: 18 +/- 15% Ohm
  • Connector:    3.5 mm 90°Jack
  • Cable length:      1,2 m., Y-Cord
  • Other features: clip, Mic
  • Box Contains: Headphones, Silicon Ear Tips, Silicon Ear Bi-flange tips, Foam ear tips, clip, hard Carry Case

Aimus Zinc Alloyed lightning cables – Test, Review

So I was after a new lightning cable and I came across the Aimus Zinc Alloyed cables on Amazon. In this article, I will test and review my purchase…

  • The cables can be found here

The Test

For the test, I used the original lightning cable supplied with my iPhone 6 and compared it with the Aimus cable. You’re probably thinking, compared what?

I used a little device called a “Charger Doctor” which measures the working voltage and current output for USB ports.

Test Results

Original Apple cable:

Test Result: 5.09 V

0.4 FT Aimus Cable

Test Result: 5.09 V

4 FT Aimus Cable

Test Result: 5.10 V

6 FT Aimus Cable

Test Result 5.10 V

The above pictures show the results of my test. For some reason, the two longer cables have a more powerful voltage. The good thing is that these chargers are close to Apple’s original.

The Review

Not only did the cable look strong and stylish, but they also come as a pack of 3 in 3 different sizes. This is extremely convenient as I can now charge my devices from a distance, the usual distance and I can use the short one with my power bank.

Specs:

  • Box contains: 1 x 0.4 FT cable, 1 x 4 FT cable, 6 FT cable, 1 x pouch, 2 x cable tidy
  • Warrenty: 18 Month
  • Material: Zinc alloy
  • Additional features:
    • Anti-oxidation
    • Anti-rust
    • Tangle-free
    • LED Light for the dark

My impression

What I like

The cables were packaged nicely, I purchased many cables in the past, most of which come either in a paper box or a cheap sleeve. The Aimus ones came in a posh looking sleeve which reflects the value of the product – Nicely done Aimus!

The design looks futuristic and modern, yes they are just cables at the end of the day but they look feel a lot stronger compared to the stock ones. Apple does a good job designing cables, but these feel stronger. The light on the lightning end just adds to the style.

It comes with two cable tidy’s. This is a great thing, especially when transporting the longer cables. Cables can easily get damaged like that. There’s even a pouch to carry them around in.

I love the fact that 3 different sizes are included in the box. It’s very convenient

What I dislike

That’s a tough one, I actually had to think real hard on this as I like the cables so much! But here I go…

The first thing I would like for the company to improve on is getting these on the High Street. There are millions of cables there already, but the ones that are out there are often cheap, nasty things, apart from the Apple ones obviously.

I know that not many people will use the pouch, but it would be nice to see Animus including either a protective case or a nicer looking pouch that reflects on the futuristic style.

Overall…

On a scale 1 to 5, 5 being best here are my scores…

  • Quality: 5
  • Ease of use: 5
  • Accessories included: 5
  • Style: 5

What is life like using a Chromebook as your main PC?

Chromebooks are those cheap laptops you find online and in stores usually for under £300. You may be thinking; What good will such a cheap laptop do for me? In this article, I will discuss how powerful a Chromebook can actually be and my experience with using a Chromebook as my everyday laptop at University.

To begin with, I don’t like to carry many things around with me that might either be heavy or unnecessary to me, so since I was in the market for a new laptop I decided that this new laptop should be small and lightweight. I looked at many laptops, including netbooks running on Windows 10 and Chromebooks running on Chrome OS, but the netbooks seemed to be slow, whereas the Chromebooks seemed to be up and running in no time.

Before I purchased my Chromebook, I have done some research into what types of web apps there are, I already knew about Google Docs and Microsoft Office Online. There turned out to be thousands of online web apps which work on Chrome OS and that’s not mentioning the browser apps that can be downloaded from the Chrome web store.

I also found that some Chromebooks support Linux, this meant that I could have a fully functioning Linux operating system. The only issue I found was that Chrome OS runs in the background.

I found a decent device on Amazon, it was the Lenovo N22. It was perfect for what I wanted it to do, it even had a carrying handle so that I can carry it like a mini suitcase, which I thought was useless. I did manage to install a run down version of Ubuntu which I used for basic programming tasks and local usage using the pre-installed Libre Office. In terms of performance, I didn’t expect much, especially when considering the price I paid but actually, I was in for a surprise as I didn’t get any lag or performance issues. This particular Chromebook also came with free cloud storage space for Google Drive.

Differences worth considering

If your like me and used to systems like Windows or Mac it can take time to get used to it, it didn’t take me long to get used to it, but hey we’re all different! In fact, from using it every day, I didn’t find it much different from the other systems. Obviously, you don’t need to purchase software for it, unless you are wanting to subscribe to Office 365, which on a Chromebook is only good if you want the 1TB cloud storage or if you are an organisation, but that’s a different story. The other major difference is the fact that it’s technically a web browser unless you purchase one with Android app support, but once again, that’s a different story! The fact that it’s only a web browser means that there is no reason for users to have performance issues unless you are carrying out heavy tasks like photo editing using one of many wonderful online tools.

So are Chromebooks suitable for everyday use?

The short answer is YES! however, there is a but! and that’s the fact that I would not recommend them if you are a heavy user. It’s a simple as that! They are perfect for basic tasks but tend to get complicated when it comes to the more demanding tasks. The only trouble is that they rely on an internet connection, although it is possible to use them offline, it depends on whether the Chrome plugin can be used offline. On the other hand, if you are using Linux then they are fine!

Want to try Chrome OS before you buy? Try it with Cloud Ready!